s

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ)


What is a Peer Support Specialist?

Peer Support Specialists are individuals in recovery from mental illness and/or substance abuse. They work to assist individuals with similar experiences by sharing their personal recovery stories and empowering them to work towards their own life goals.

Peer support involves sharing experiences, inspiring hope, and offering acceptance, assistance, and encouragement. We look forward to helping you move forward in your personal recovery journey!

All Peer Support Specialists in the state of Michigan are trained and certified by the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH).

What is Wellness?

Wellness is a lifelong, active process of becoming aware of and making choices toward a healthy and fulfilling life.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has identified Eight Dimensions of Wellness:

1. Emotional - Developing skills and strategies to cope with stress.
2. Environmental - Good health by occupying pleasant, stimulating environments that support well-being.
3. Financial - Satisfaction with current and future financial situations.
4. Intellectual - Recognizing creative abilities and finding ways to expand knowledge and skills.
5. Occupational - Personal satisfaction and enrichment derived from one’s work.
6. Physical - Recognizing the need for physical activity, diet, sleep, and nutrition.
7. Social - Developing a sense of connection and a well-developed support system.
8. Spiritual - Search for meaning and purpose in the human experience.

For more information on SAMHSA’s Eight Dimensions of Wellness, visit the website for their 10x10 Wellness Campaign at http://www.10x10.samhsa.gov.

What is Recovery?

Recovery is a deeply personal and unique process of exploring one’s attitudes, values, feelings, goals, skills, and roles while working towards a more satisfying, hopeful, and contributing life in spite of personal challenges.

Lori Ashcroft, Executive Director of the Recovery Opportunity Center, has defined recovery as “remembering who you are and using your strengths and resources to become all that you were meant to be.”